Theology Thursday: 4 Ancient Faith Podcasts that All Christians Can Enjoy

It’s been a very long time since I’ve done one of these, partially because I’ve been on a theological journey myself. I don’t want to get too personal, but I’ll say briefly that I’ve decided to “swim the Bosphorus,” and I’m now in the process of joining the Orthodox Church. You can ask me about that in comments if you’re interested, but I really don’t want to overshare. I just wanted to explain the new featured image for Theology Thursday and the reason for this post!

Even though I’m heading East myself, I still have a great liking and respect for many aspects of Western Christianity, and I’m always looking for common ground between the traditions of the East and the West. So today I’m going to share 5 podcasts from Ancient Faith Radio that I think any Christian could enjoy, even those who aren’t specifically Orthodox.

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Surprised by Loss: Three Atypical Modern Epics

Hey, everyone! Long time no see. Sorry for the long break. My last year of high school has been crazy! But now that I’ve been accepted to college, my thesis has been written and defended, and I GRADUATED HIGH SCHOOL (!)—I can get back to blogging.

Today, I’d like to talk about the genre of the epic. No, I’m not going to talk about the Aeneid or The Divine Comedy or Paradise Lost (though you can bring those up in the comments if you want). I’m going to tell you about three of my favorite books (of which there are many), all of which were written in or after the 20th century.

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7 Books I’m Reading for This Year’s Literature Class + An Announcement

I love reading, but I am terrible about getting off my bum and reading important, weighty books. You know, hard books. Books that are over a thousand years old. Or books that wrestle with tough questions. Or books that delve into the darkness of the human soul.

If left to my own devices, I’d just read Shakespeare comedies and C.S. Lewis (whose writings, although complex, are quite readable) all the time. That’s why I appreciate literature classes: they push me into books that I’d never read otherwise.

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6 Reasons Why You Should Watch The Longest Day this D-Day

As you may know, today, June 5, is Barricade Day. I’m sure that many of us will watch Les Miserables and cry accordingly.

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If you’re still in the mood for commemorating a historical event with a long, epic movie featuring amazing characters… why not watch The Longest Day tomorrow?

Made in 1962, The Longest Day covers (almost) every aspect of June 6, 1944, better known as D-Day–or Operation Overlord, or the Allied invasion of Normandy, depending on how descriptive you want to get. Here’s 6 reasons why you should watch The Longest Day this June 6.

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