The “What Do I Think About Art” Tag

In which Kana unwittingly opens the Pandora’s box of all my thoughts about art philosophy. I’m sorry. You did nothing to deserve this.

The “What Do I Think About Art” tag was created by My Mind Speaks Aloud. If you haven’t already checked out her blog, you should! She’s really thoughtful, and she posts about music a lot.

Huge thanks to Kana at The Halfhazard Wanderer for tagging me! I love her blog so much. Her stories are full of wit and humor, and she draws the cutest little pictures to go along with her posts. I was so excited to be tagged! This is my first tag on my blog, and my love for analyzing art is only rivaled by my love for analyzing sound devices in poetry.

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Poetry Friday: “Blackberry Picking” by Seamus Heaney

In Texas, nature hates you.

If you walk barefoot across a field, you are certain to get bitten and/or stabbed by at least three angry bugs or plants. If you scour the bushes for something edible, you’ll be lucky if you come across one dewberry. More likely, you’ll find poison ivy and a thorny vine.

When I visited Oregon, Canada, and Michigan, I was surprised to discover that nature doesn’t hate you. You can walk across a field barefoot, and the clover-covered ground is springy and comforting. Berry bushes pop up everywhere–Marion berries, salmonberries, blueberries, blackberries, black raspberries–without you even looking for them.

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Theology Thursday: Reading Scripture with the Quadriga

Christians today often want to interpret Scripture either completely literally or completely metaphorically: either everything in the Bible is scientific fact, or it is all a myth. Traditionally, the Church has not seen things this way. In the Middle Ages, Christians read Scripture with a method of interpretation called the “Quadriga” (“a four-horse chariot”). The Quadriga has four “yokes,” or ways to interpret, that help you think about every level of truth that Scripture reveals.

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Confessions of a Reluctant Plantser

It is a period of civil war.

The universe of writers is divided under two banners, the Planners (those who outline their stories–also called Plotters) and Pantsers (those who write by the seat of their pants). Planners call Pantsers sloppy and undisciplined. Pantsers retort that Planners are control freaks and overachievers. A few traitorous double agents, the Plantsers, are the only overlap between the two groups.

Or, at least, that’s how I once saw it.

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I guess my hair is sinful? and other thoughts while reading Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre. Just the name makes me feel like I’m on a windswept moor straggling toward a looming house in the distance. The moor is bare, except for a gnarled tree where ravens roost… just kidding. It makes me feel like I’m sitting in my literature classroom agonizing over an in-class essay. Turns out, the cold chill of the moor and the cold chill of having two minutes to finish my paper aren’t that different.

Anyway, here are 7 thoughts I had while reading Jane Eyre, that most wonderful and confusing of Gothic novels. WARNING: spoilers ahead!

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6 Reasons Why You Should Watch The Longest Day this D-Day

As you may know, today, June 5, is Barricade Day. I’m sure that many of us will watch Les Miserables and cry accordingly.

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If you’re still in the mood for commemorating a historical event with a long, epic movie featuring amazing characters… why not watch The Longest Day tomorrow?

Made in 1962, The Longest Day covers (almost) every aspect of June 6, 1944, better known as D-Day–or Operation Overlord, or the Allied invasion of Normandy, depending on how descriptive you want to get. Here’s 6 reasons why you should watch The Longest Day this June 6.

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